Josh Strang Joins DR.D

Norco, CA (January 28, 2013)

­Dubach Racing Development (DR.D) is proud to announce the signing of Josh Strang to compete in the 2013 GNCC series aboard a Kawasaki KX450F. No stranger to winning, the Australian was the 2010 GNCC champion and is looking to add another championship to his resume. The opening round will be held in River Ranch, Florida on March 9th.  

Strang looks to capture his second GNCC title

The GNCC is the biggest off-road racing series in the United States and Josh will rely on the new DR.D NS-4 exhaust system to meet his performance needs. “I’m excited to work alongside DR.D for this year’s GNCC series. With such late notice, I appreciate the support they have given me and can’t wait to start winning races” mentions Strang regarding his 2013 campaign.


Yamaha YZ450F Performance package – TWMX February 2013 issue

Check out the February issue of the Transworld magazine for the full story on the performance package given to their ’13 YZ450f. The bike was fitted with a engine relocation kit, radiator lowering kit, and an all new exhaust that may be available in the future.


Got Horsepower?

Jason Smith has worked alongside the crew at DR.D building a 100% nitro injected YZ450f hillclimb bike. The bike is fitted with a SS/Al DR.D pipe to supply the power to get him to the top of the hill! Truly one of a kind motorcycle.


DR.D Signs Velocity 3 Yamaha

Norco, CA (January 2, 2013) ­Dubach Racing Development (DR.D) has joined forces with Velocity 3 Racing Yamaha for the 2013 racing season. The newly formed Velocity 3 team will make its debut in the upcoming AMA Supercross Series with riders Kyle Chisholm and Bobby Kiniry aboard YZ450’s. 

Doug Dubach is no stranger to the Yamaha 450, having played a instrumental role in its development and looks forward to working alongside Chisholm and Kiniry. “I’m really excited for the opportunity to share my knowledge with two great riders like Kyle and Bobby. I feel that DR.D has a lot to offer in performance parts for their bikes” claims Dubach.


DR.D Sweeps Vet World Championship

Norco, CA. (November 6, 2012) Dubach Racing Development (DR.D) continued its winning ways at the annual MTA Vet World Championship hosted at Glen Helen Raceway. DR.D competed on Saturday with Doug Dubach in the 40+ pro class and brought the powerful duo of Ryan Hughes and Doug Dubach out for Sunday’s 30+ pro class.

Coming into the event with a record 19 World Championships, Doug Dubach, was looking to add another to his resume. With the help of great starts, Doug, would overcome the challenging Glen Helen course and talented field of riders to win the 40+ pro class via 1-1 Moto scores. The championship would mark another milestone for Dubach as he is now a 20x Vet World Champion.

Hughes, Dubach, and Sleeter lead the pack through "Talladega"

Sunday’s 30+ pro class would witness the debut of Ryan Hughes aboard his new DR.D backed RMZ450 along with the return of Doug Dubach. During the first Moto, Hughes, would go down hard and remount to finish 3rd ahead of Dubach in 4th. Despite his freshly stitched arm, Ryan Hughes was all business in the second Moto and used his 3-1 Moto scores to capture the 30+ pro championship. As Hughes captured his 5th World Championship, the top five would be filled by Tedesco, Preston, Sleeter, and Dubach fifth overall with 4-4 Moto scores.


Chronicmx.com: Product Review – DR.D Engine relocation kit

   

Thanks to James Stewart’s hype and a host of ultra picky magazine test riders, almost everyone has heard that the new Yamaha YZ 450f chassis has room for improvement in the handling department. The claim is that the YZ450f has a tendency to get a bit loose heading into the entrance of certain turns. Ironically, those same complaints come from individuals that also confirm the new YZ 450f is without a doubt, the most reliable motocross bike on the market, and that it’s handling is also vastly improved over the pre-2010 YZ 450f models. Nevertheless, just as every rider can always improve upon his skills, every bike… no matter how great, will always have some way it could probably perform better. We honestly think the YZ 450f is a phenomenal bike, yet agree that the front end has a tendency to get loose in specific conditions. The good news is that with a little help from expert’s like Doug ‘The Doctor” Dubach, who has spent countless hours doing research and development for Yamaha, the YZ 450f’s handling characteristics can be greatly improved for very little of your hard earned cash.

Here is what Doug Dubach, his crew, and a host of other smart engineers have discovered… combining a longer rear shock linkage with a rather simple engine relocation kit, the new YZ 450f can handle spectacularly. Our own team’s YZ 450f now, honestly, handles just about as good as any bike we have ever owned…and we have been riding for 35 years. We are actually quite amazed at how the YZ 450f can literally ‘turn on a dime’…regardless of any negative gossip floating around the pits. The longer rear shock linkage successfully lowers the bike’s rear end, while the Dr. D engine relocation kit lowers the front end, for a more perfect balance. As a result, the YZ 450f has a lower center of gravity, while most importantly, the bike’s weight is moved farther towards the front wheel to make the front tire stick better. Consider for example, the simple concept of how a dirt bike’s front end can often grip better when lightly applying the front brake. That improved front end grip is from a forward shift of weight… and the effect of the YZ 450f engine relocation kit is a somewhat similar concept that successfully moves weight forward.

We tested Dr. D’s YZ 450f engine relocation kit via several Chronic MX team riders, who all have lots of seat time aboard the new YZ 450f. They tested at several southeastern tracks in Florida, Tennessee, South Carolina and North Carolina. Unanimously everyone noticed an improvement in the bikes front end manners. Team Chronic MX has chosen to run Yamaha’s for the last decade due to their incredible reliability and proven performance. Ironically the same year that riders complained about the new YZ 450f chassis, amateur’s all across the country were placing the exact model bike on top of podiums. In 2012 for example, Yamaha won a total of 11 championship titles at Loretta Lynn’s, more than any other manufacturer…several aboard Yamaha’s new YZ 450f. ”Riders turned the podium blue this week, from the PW50 to our new YZ450F,” said Donnie Luce, Yamaha’s amateur motocross coordinator. Meanwhile, Paul Whibley continued to put his new YZ 450f on the podium in 2012, after winning dozens of OMA and GNCC off-road races and several championship titles in 2010 and 2011…all on the new YZ 450f chassis. Therefore, just because the new YZ 450f doesn’t work for James Stewart, certainly doesn’t mean it wont work for you.

Ironically, one of our own Team Chronic MX’s YZ 450f’s parked right next to Doug Dubach’s #15 on the starting gate at Loretta’s this year. The point however is not to prove that the YZ 450f truly is a winning machine. This review is about how to make the new YZ 450f an even better bike. And that’s where the Dr. D engine relocation kit comes into play. The kit retails for $149.95 and is quite possibly one of the single best improvements that can be made to the new YZ 450f Yamaha. The only other aftermarket improvement that may be equally as effective in improving performance (not handling) was via Injectioneering’s throttle body modification: ( http://www.chronicmx.com/secret-weapon-of-the-pros-and-the-ultimate-yz-450f-cure-injectioneerings-throttle-body-modification/ ). The Dr. D kit is definitely a great product though, and we’d be inclined to purchase it first if you can only afford one of these ‘cures’. The kit comes with motor-mount inserts that allow the engine to be moved forward in order to shift valuable weight back onto the front wheel, for increased traction and better overall handling. Apparently the YZ450F’s new frame has a slightly steepened head angle which relocated weight farther rearward. By moving the engine forward approximately 2.5mm, a shift in weight occurs towards the front wheel. That shift in weight is exactly what ‘the doctor called for’ in order to get the new YZ 450f chassis perfectly dialed in. We highly recommend this aftermarket product if you have a new 2010 and up Yamaha YZ 450f. Installation is not the most fun part, and can be tricky, but Dr. D has created a very helpful instructional video to make the project much easier. Stay tuned for more helpful tech tips and product reviews, and be sure to follow us on facebook http://www.facebook.com/ChronicMotox . Cheers, Chronic MX.


TWMX: Catching Up With Ryan Hughes

By
Tue, Oct 9 2012 11:43 am

One of the most interesting additions to this weekend’s SLAM Pro Race roster is Ryan Hughes. A veteran of the sport, “Ryno” has been racing since before some of his competitiors were even born, but his speed and fitness are as sharp as ever. Though he is off the professional circuit, his life may actually be busier than ever by training riders, running a gym, and managing the Rynopower supplement brand. We got a few minutes of his time on Sunday night to talk about his expectations for this weekend.

How did the idea of you racing the SLAM this year come up?

Warren Johnson asked me if I wanted to do the Industry Cup for Fox, since I am an employee of them in the testing department, and I thought it sounded pretty fun. They said that the SLAM is on Saturday and that it is five grand to win and a cover, and I thought, “I could use five grand and my company could use a cover.” I’ll never know if I don’t try.

No offense, but if you get the cover, you may be our oldest cover star. How many times have you been on the cover of any magazine?

I had it with Racer X probably four times, once with TransWorld, Motocross Action, and all the rest. But it has been a while since TransWorld.

Will you have to switch your riding style any? You are more known for your endurance in events like A Day in the Dirt and the Coup de Grace.

The biggest thing is that I just switched bikes. I got a new Suzuki 450 the other day and I have only ridden it one time. I have it all done with Factory Connection, DRD, and the engine, but I don’t have it all figured out or feel 100-percent yet. I should probably be able to ride three times this week and hopefully will be able to figure it out by Saturday. Race wise, I think I am very good at sprinting. I’m a very fast starter, which will go into my hands on that race, but I am not 20 years old. We will see how fast I can be in the beginning and how many times I can (Laughs).

 

 

And you are not afraid of getting aggressive…

Of course not. I like to race hard, but I don’t like to race hard and slam and bump people or have them do the same to me, but if that is what the race calls for, it is what I will bring out.

How have you spent the year from the last time we talked at Day in the Dirt? I know you just got back from the Vet des Nations in Europe, you have been running Rynopower, and raced Hangtown.

Yeah, I just did the Vet des Nations last month. It was a blast. I had a great time riding old bikes against racers I used to go against in the GPs and being on a team with a lot of my heros. After that, I did some schools in Colorado at Thunder Valley and it went really well. But other than that, I have just being getting the bikes ready, do the training, do the gym work, work on the new Rynopower gym website, which is going good, and staying on top of the supplements. It is a constant battle through the day, and then to keep kids, a wife, and hobbies, so I don’t rest (Laughs).

That’s not necessarily a bad thing, because at least they are the things you like.

It keeps me out of trouble.

Even though you only have a limited amount of time on the bike, how different does it feel than the Yamaha?

It feels different. There are some things that are better, but there are some I am not as comfortable with yet. I just have to work through those bugs and get it figured out, just to go out to have a good time and give it my best shot. If I don’t try, I won’t know if I can win this thing or not, and I can’t get through life guessing or wondering, “What if I did that?”