(TWMX.COM) Meet The Industry: DR.D’s Casey Huntley

The racers of the sport deservedly catch the attention of the media and fans, but behind every rider on the line are the brands that give them the latest products. These companies work to establish a strong following from the grassroots of the sport to the top tier by various means of support. At the helm of DRD’s Rider Support program is Casey Huntley, who we recently sat down with to learn more about his role at the exhaust manufacturer.

Casey Huntley is in charge of media relations and rider support at Dubach Racing Development, but he also helps out with some track testing when his schedule permits. He's also our test rider Jessie Huntley's older brother. Don't hold that against him

Casey, you are a former racer but are now the Rider Support and Media Coordinator at Dubach Racing. How did you happen upon the job?
I grew up racing but basically I had arm pump times a thousand, and it lead to nerve damage and carpal tunnel in my forearms. I also did testing for White Brothers and Vance & Hines, so I had a history in the pipe industry. My brother is a DRD support rider, so that led into me getting to know everyone here. My buddy Mark Tilley was the rider support manager here before he moved on to Dirt Bike Magazine, and he put in a good word for me to fill his spot.

What does your job here entail?
I oversee all of our amateur and professional riders and make sure that they are taken care of. I also help with product testing and development, and then make sure our advertisements and media relationships are taken care of.

When a rider is sponsored by DRD and you say you take care of them, what kinds of support do that get? Is it one pipe a year or is it full maintenance?
It is all year, but it depends on their level of sponsorship. We have some they get 25 or 35 percent off of products, but then we have our elite guys that may get four or five pipes a year and services when needed.

How many riders does DRD support and sponsor?
It’s hard to say, but it is a couple hundred. Of course all of those guys are not getting free product, but there is always a chance to better yourself here. If you get good results and do a good job marketing the company, you can gain more support.

Because of Doug’s relationship with Yamaha, DRD has been known in the past as more of a Yamaha exhaust company. Is it still like that?
Yamaha sales are good and Kawasaki sales are strong. Sometimes people like to think we are exceptionally good on a Yamaha but question our other stuff, but we have had quite a few riders come back and tell us how much better our pipes work when compared to other companies. I know everything is ridden by Doug firsthand and we don’t solely rely on dynos. Doug’s history as a test rider is known from his time at Yamaha and Dunlop.

The NS-4 muffler design is the latest and greatest from DRD. It features a new muffler shape and end cap design, which reduces sound and improves power.

The experience we have with the products are good, usable power, and are not gnarly because Doug rides them and wants to make improvements that can be put to good use, not just a giant hit.
Exactly. It needs to be something that will work for both the beginners and professionals. Just because it makes three more horsepower on the dyno doesn’t mean it will be good “in the seat of the pants” and on the track.

Do you sometimes have to explain that to customers that are only looking for a gigantic hit?
Actually, I just had a customer call and ask to see a dyno chart for a bike. They said they would not purchase the pipe unless they saw a chart. Riding with your product is so much more important than the dyno. People in the sport that know Doug and the brand know we won’t put something out that does not perform.

How much time does he spend in the office? Is he usually out riding and testing? For instance, he is not here now.
(Laughs) Doug’s riding has cut back a lot over the last few years. He hard to work extremely hard to win both championships at Loretta’s this year because his riding time is cut back. He is here a lot. He comes in at 5:30 in the morning and a lot of times doesn’t leave until six or seven at night. He spends his fair share of time in the shop.

Has he started to make two-stroke mini pipes now that his son is racing?
We actually have done some two-stroke stuff and we made them up, but we do not have them available yet. It is something we can launch at any time, but it is hard to find someone to do the stamping and help us get the balling rolling in the US. It is something we are working on and if it is up to me, you will see it happen in the next few months.

What else is new from DRD?
We have our new products coming out in about a month. It is called the NS-4 and we have changed a few things with it. We now have a one-piece end cap that is riveted on so that it is nice and secure. We changed a few small things like the pipe stickers and our perf-core inside the can will run all the way from the beginning to the end of the cap. Now you will have packing in the end cap, which is something we did not have before. It will help with performance and lower the sound, as well.

Do you do as much test riding yourself now as before?
Not as much as I used to, because when I do ride there is so much pain that comes along in my arm. It is something that I have been doing a little bit of lately and surprisingly I don’t feel like too big of a spode for not doing it as much anymore. I am going to get back into more because it fits my position so well.

And now it sounds like your younger brother will be going pro…
Yeah, he is going pro. He is working hard, so we will see where it goes. There are a lot of fast guys and a life outside motocross, so I want him to do his best at school and riding and see where it takes him.


Racer X: Open Mic – Doug Dubach

Former Yamaha factory rider Doug Dubach never actually retired from this sport, and although his racing, riding and testing days aren’t quite as frequent as they once were, he’s still fast when he needs to be. This year, at age 49, he managed to win both the 45 Plus and 40 Plus titles at the Red Bull AMA Amateur Nationals at Loretta’s, pulling out a tough victory over Mike Treadwell in a third-moto showdown in 40 Plus. The personable Dubach loves to talk, so we hit record at closing ceremonies from the Ranch.

Racer X: Pretty good week, and you kind of had the deck stacked up against you the way your age worked out.
Doug Dubach: Yeah, and this race is crazy because you never know who is going to show and up be ready. I saw [Barry] Carsten at the Regional, and I saw all of these guys, and I was like ‘Man, it’s going to be on.’ Then I guess Keith Johnson had something happen and he couldn’t race, so all of a sudden it’s this other group, and they’re all fast. You know, I battled Destry [Abbott] at the Regional, and we went at it! I’m like ‘It’s going to be on at Loretta’s.’ Maybe my experience here kind of helped me, because I was able to beat him here, but Treadwell has obviously been training hard. I have to get out of my office chair a little more before I come here, because these guys are after me!

Well, what is your schedule nowadays? We all think of you as the guy that rides and tests all the time. Is that true any more?It’s very different than what it once was. Three or four years ago I had the golden life, I tested with Yamaha and Dunlop tires and everybody, but budgets have changed and shrunk and things are different. And, my kids keep getting bigger, and now I have all-stars in just about every other ball sport. My kids are this good, Loretta’s good, just in different sports besides motorcycle racing! So weekends, they’re a giveaway doing stuff with the kids, so I have to sneak out to Milestone for riding at night here and there during the week. I’ll sneak the boy out with me. He almost qualified for here, he was an alternate in the 50 class, he got to practice so he was pumped, but he didn’t get to race. So yeah, for me it’s a very different life than it was a few years ago.

So no one can say you win because you get paid to ride?Not unless I write myself a check! I do still test for Yamaha, but that’s two or three big chunks of the year, it’s not consistent anymore. I do Mammoth, I do my Vet Race in California, and I do a two-stroke race, so I don’t go over the gate more than a few times a year anymore. I think that’s why it takes me a few motos here to get going. Like I said, my weekends aren’t spent at the race track anymore, it’s at a soccer field! I think what helps me is that I never removed myself from it too much, I never retired, I stayed fit, I still love riding my dirt bikes. I started late, I didn’t race my first race until I was almost 15 years old! I think that helps, maybe that’s it, or maybe it’s just my personality, whatever it is I just never got out of riding.

Take me through that final 40 Plus moto, you and Treadwell were tied going in. Were you nervous?You know what, I was excited! Like I talk about in my seminars, I put myself in a great state of mind, I was just pumped and positive that whole race. I had a little problem, no body knew, but my front brake started to go out. That last lap and a half we got into lappers and it got tight, I have the marks on my boots he was so close to me.

You said you and Treadwell battled before?Yeah, in 2000 in the Canadian Nationals, I dominated that series that year, be he and I had some motos! I remember one moto, I didn’t realize it was him, we were just back and forth the whole time, for like third or something! It was awesome. I love that guy, even though he ran into me twice on that last lap, we were laughing about it on the podium! I love the spirit of these guys. If it weren’t for people like him, and John Grewe, I wouldn’t have a great time here. To race like that, Grewe kept me honest all week in that 45 Plus! It was awesome!

You didn’t start racing here until you were over 40 in 2006, and you’re having so much fun with it, do you wish you had started coming here earlier?You know, now that I know how fun it is, I really wish I did. It’s such a great event. My kids love it! Last year we didn’t come for a few reasons, and my kids were more mad about it than me! They talk about this being this great motocross vacation, and it really is. Last week we took a vacation on the American River up by Hangtown, we were out in the rapids having a great time, and they were like, “Yeah but next week at Loretta’s, it’s going to be even better!” They got to ride the BMX bikes, drive RC cars, jump into the creek. And my daughter, it’s always her birthday here so she gets special treatment, and my wife, she loves the hot weather, so even she loves it here! I say it on the podium every time: I’ve raced in motocross races all over the world. I’ve raced in over 20 countries, I mean what I say, this is an outstanding event. I’ve got kids at three different ages, and they all have a great time. I hope I’m healthy enough to keep coming back and back and back, because I absolutely love this event, and I love riding and racing dirt bikes.


The “Doctor” strikes again

Doug Dubach would continue his success at Loretta Lynn’s ranch by winning 2 championships, bringing his career total to 9. The wins would not come easy for him as he faced stiffed competition in both of his classes. In the senior 45+, Doug went 1-1-2 and was kept honest by fellow DR.D rider John Grewe. The senior 40+ class came down to a battle between Doug Dubach and Mike Treadwell, but in the end Doug would overcome the pressure and take home the championship with 3-1-1 moto scores.


John Grewe Podiums At Loretta’s

John Grewe had a great week at Loretta Lynn’s putting his DR.D backed Kawasaki on the podium several times. John kept Doug Dubach honest throughout the week and would finish 2nd overall in the senior 45+ class via 2-2-1 moto scores. The senior 40+ class would once again showcase his strong riding as he would go 2-4-4 for 4th place overall.


Racer X’s Daily Report: Mammoth Motocross, Sunday

The 2012 Vet weekend at Mammoth has wrapped up with some great results in all classes. In the 40-plus Expert class it was Dr. D, Doug Dubach, stealing the show with 1-1-1-1 finishes to win the overall.

WAY TO GO DOUG!


REM GLEN HELEN MOTOCROSS REPORT: MXA REPORTING

Built on the site of the legendary Arroyo Cycle Park, REM motocross is still working out the bugs of its brand-new layout, but the riders are all hammer down

450 Pro winner Daniel McCoy. Photo: Mark Chilson

Normally the foreign riders in SoCal go home for the summer (no need to stay in California when its nice back home), but with the Australian National Motocross Championship taking a six-week break, Aussie Daniel McCoy came to SoCal looking for more racing and riding. McCoy is currently ninth in the Australian Championships. McCoy was joined in the United Nations by fellow Aussie Dan Alamangos, 250 Intermediate winner Swede DR.D rider Kristoffer Palm and double class winner South African Alan Julien.

Steven Tokarski. Photo: Mark Chilson

Pete Murray won the Open Expert class, the first moto of the Over-50 Experts and the most roost ever from a YZ125 award. Photo:Ernie Becker

450 Pro: McCoy got the competition he was looking for in the first 450 Pro moto as Vance & Hines’ Steven Tokarski shot into the lead and was never headed. McCoy had to work his way through Bill Lea, Dennis Stapleton and Lee Witt to get to second. The moto finished with Tokarski first, McCoy second, Witt third and Lea fourth. Stapleton was racing the Vet Pro class, but finished fifth overall.

MXA is building a Yamaha WR450 project bike. It is a YZ250F frame with a WR450F engine tucked in (it is the pre-2010 YZ450F engine, but equipped with fuel injection and electric start). With minimal mods, it went from the same bike we raced at the GNCC a couple months ago to a motocross bike on Saturday. Photo: Mark Chilson

In the second moto, McCoy got the drop on the start and he and Tokarski started a cat-and-mouse game that looked like it could go either way. After three laps of nose to tail racing, Tokarski suddenly pulled to the side of the track with a mechanical problem. It was easy sailing after that for Daniel McCoy. Second overall went to Dennis Stapleton, who was racing MXA’s Yamaha WR450 enduro project bike. Stapleton actually came from the back and passed his way up to second on a WR450 that only had the headlight removed and stiffer springs installed. Stapleton, however, didn’t count in the 450 Pro results, so second went to Bill Lea with a 4-2 with fellow Northern Californian Lee Witt third with a 3-3. Witt and Lea came down from up north to test their fitness on the very tough REM track. Witt, although he finished third, was the only rider to double out of REM’s lower section by turning a step-up into a step-up over a second jump down the track.

Dan McCoy (65) didn’t get the best start in the first moto and had to work his way up to second place. Here he uses every inch of track in pursuit of Bill Lea (100). Photo: Mark Chilson

Alan Julien (7) is chased by Kevin Worrell (also number 7) in the Over-40 Intermediate class. Photo: Mark Chilson

South African Alan Julien won two classes on Saturday. Julien went 1-1 in the Vet Intermediates (in front of a top five of Rowan Trefz, Pat Lopez, Vance Freeman and David Dipietro). Julien then returned three races later to sweep both motos of the Over-40 Intermediates. Gary Bowman (2-2), Ian Fitz-Gibbon (3-3), Bret Anderson (5-5), Phillip Wurster (4-6), Dean Adkins (7-4), Mike Gee (6-7), Dan Alamangos (12-8), CT Falk (11-9) and Sam Ramirez (10-14) made up the top ten of the Over-40 class.

Arizona’s Ed Foedish (326) is caught in an MXA sandwich as John Minert (19) and Willy Musgrave (13) play bookends. Photo: Mark Chilson

Over-40 Pro: You couldn’t ask for a better race than the Over-40 Pro class as Arizona’s Ed Foedish and MXA’s Willy Musgrave engaged in two very intense motos. Foedish led virtually ever lap of both motos with Musgrave on a YZ250F never more than 50 feet behind him. But, Foedish didn’t get to lead the last lap in either moto…as Musgrave used superior downhill speed to make up for the lack of uphill horsepower against Foedish’s KX450F.

THE REALLY BIG CLASSES

MXA tests bikes by racing them and our WR450 project bike got a workout at REM as we raced it in as many classes and with as many test riders as possible. Here, John Basher (23) holehots in front of Rudy Renka (6), Robby Gilbert (726) and Randel Fout (52). Photo: Mark Chilson

The old guys dominated the classes and the turnout as the four biggest classes of the day were the Over-50 Intermediates, Over-50 Novices, Over-40 Novices and Over-40 Intermediates.

Over-50 Intermediates: Last week Mike Monaghan came from the back of the pack to win the Over-50 Intermediates on a Husqvarna CR144. This week he came from the back to win on a 2012 Yamaha YZ125. His main competition this week was the same rider as last week. Randy Skinner holeshot both motos and led for the majority of the motos until Monaghan arrived at the front. The final results were Mike Monaghan (1-1), Randy Skinner (3-2), Paul Fitz-Gibbon (2-4), Brian Allen (4-6), George Kohler (6-5), Joe Sutter (9-3), Owen Fitzsimon (8-7), John Caper (7-9), Mike Phillips (5-11) and Pete Vetrano (11-8).

LightSpeed owner Willie Amaradio raced the bike of 2011 Two-Stroke World Champion Austin Howell to second overall in the Over-50 Expert class. Over-50 winner Randel Fout was also two-stroke mounted. Photo: Mark Chilson

Over-50 Novice: With a full gate of riders the battle for supremacy in the Over-50 Novices has been very intense this year…and even though the honor of victory is eventually getting moved up to the much tougher Over-50 Intermediate class, every rider has been giving it his all. Mike Brownfield’s 1-2 took the win over Jeff Scott’s 4-1. Brian Underdahl (3-3), Terry Varner (5-4), Ian Pederson (7-6), Paul Chaffee (6-7), Michael Mosca (2-13), John Tookey (10-8), Brian Martin (9-9) and Steve Surber (8-10) rounded out the top ten.

Pasha Afshar (L7) and Kenny Safford (101) look like models in an AXO photo. Safford finished third in the Over-40 Novices, while last week’s winner, Afshar, ended up ninth. Photo: Mark Chilson

Over-40 Novices: Mike Borowski went 1-2 to beat Joe Sutter’s 5-1. Famous AXO and Alpinestars designer Kenny Safford was third with a 6-3 in front of John Maldonado (2-7), Gavin Antill (4-6) and Gary Harada (3-8).

Over-40 Intermediates: This was the second class that Alan Julien won.

Brian Stoner (749), Tom Hinz (92), Ernie Becker (23) and Billy Seifert rise above one of REM’s many hills in the Vet Novice class. Photo: Mark Chilson

Notable others: Matt Bynum (250 Novice), Braden Larson (450 Novice), Adam Dichter (Vet Beginner), Bill Nagy (450 Beginner), Tyler Weyman (125 Novice), Randel Fout (Over-50 Expert), Ray Pisarski (Over-60 Expert), Ciaran Heit (85 Expert) and Kyle Heit (85 Beginner) were all winners.

This photo may look tilted, but it’s not. Cary Brown (93) is on the flat section, while Ron Lawson (2), Braden Larson (21) and Brian Stoner are transitioning from on camber to off camber. Photo: Mark Chilson

REM races again next Saturday June 9. For more info go to www.remsatmx.com


REM GLEN HELEN MOTOCROSS REPORT: MXA REPORTING

Built on the site of the legendary Arroyo Cycle Park, REM motocross is still working out the bugs of its brand-new layout, but the riders are all hammer down

450 Pro winner Daniel McCoy. Photo: Mark Chilson

Normally the foreign riders in SoCal go home for the summer (no need to stay in California when its nice back home), but with the Australian National Motocross Championship taking a six-week break, Aussie Daniel McCoy came to SoCal looking for more racing and riding. McCoy is currently ninth in the Australian Championships. McCoy was joined in the United Nations by fellow Aussie Dan Alamangos, 250 Intermediate winner Swede Kristoffer Palm and double class winner South African Alan Julien.

Steven Tokarski. Photo: Mark Chilson

Pete Murray won the Open Expert class, the first moto of the Over-50 Experts and the most roost ever from a YZ125 award. Photo:Ernie Becker

450 Pro: McCoy got the competition he was looking for in the first 450 Pro moto as Vance & Hines’ Steven Tokarski shot into the lead and was never headed. McCoy had to work his way through Bill Lea, Dennis Stapleton and Lee Witt to get to second. The moto finished with Tokarski first, McCoy second, Witt third and Lea fourth. Stapleton was racing the Vet Pro class, but finished fifth overall.

MXA is building a Yamaha WR450 project bike. It is a YZ250F frame with a WR450F engine tucked in (it is the pre-2010 YZ450F engine, but equipped with fuel injection and electric start). With minimal mods, it went from the same bike we raced at the GNCC a couple months ago to a motocross bike on Saturday. Photo: Mark Chilson

In the second moto, McCoy got the drop on the start and he and Tokarski started a cat-and-mouse game that looked like it could go either way. After three laps of nose to tail racing, Tokarski suddenly pulled to the side of the track with a mechanical problem. It was easy sailing after that for Daniel McCoy. Second overall went to Dennis Stapleton, who was racing MXA’s Yamaha WR450 enduro project bike. Stapleton actually came from the back and passed his way up to second on a WR450 that only had the headlight removed and stiffer springs installed. Stapleton, however, didn’t count in the 450 Pro results, so second went to Bill Lea with a 4-2 with fellow Northern Californian Lee Witt third with a 3-3. Witt and Lea came down from up north to test their fitness on the very tough REM track. Witt, although he finished third, was the only rider to double out of REM’s lower section by turning a step-up into a step-up over a second jump down the track.

Dan McCoy (65) didn’t get the best start in the first moto and had to work his way up to second place. Here he uses every inch of track in pursuit of Bill Lea (100). Photo: Mark Chilson

Alan Julien (7) is chased by Kevin Worrell (also number 7) in the Over-40 Intermediate class. Photo: Mark Chilson

South African Alan Julien won two classes on Saturday. Julien went 1-1 in the Vet Intermediates (in front of a top five of Rowan Trefz, Pat Lopez, Vance Freeman and David Dipietro). Julien then returned three races later to sweep both motos of the Over-40 Intermediates. Gary Bowman (2-2), Ian Fitz-Gibbon (3-3), Bret Anderson (5-5), Phillip Wurster (4-6), Dean Adkins (7-4), Mike Gee (6-7), Dan Alamangos (12-8), CT Falk (11-9) and Sam Ramirez (10-14) made up the top ten of the Over-40 class.

Arizona’s Ed Foedish (326) is caught in an MXA sandwich as John Minert (19) and Willy Musgrave (13) play bookends. Photo: Mark Chilson

Over-40 Pro: You couldn’t ask for a better race than the Over-40 Pro class as Arizona’s Ed Foedish and MXA’s Willy Musgrave engaged in two very intense motos. Foedish led virtually ever lap of both motos with Musgrave on a YZ250F never more than 50 feet behind him. But, Foedish didn’t get to lead the last lap in either moto…as Musgrave used superior downhill speed to make up for the lack of uphill horsepower against Foedish’s KX450F.

THE REALLY BIG CLASSES

MXA tests bikes by racing them and our WR450 project bike got a workout at REM as we raced it in as many classes and with as many test riders as possible. Here, John Basher (23) holehots in front of Rudy Renka (6), Robby Gilbert (726) and Randel Fout (52). Photo: Mark Chilson

The old guys dominated the classes and the turnout as the four biggest classes of the day were the Over-50 Intermediates, Over-50 Novices, Over-40 Novices and Over-40 Intermediates.

Over-50 Intermediates: Last week Mike Monaghan came from the back of the pack to win the Over-50 Intermediates on a Husqvarna CR144. This week he came from the back to win on a 2012 Yamaha YZ125. His main competition this week was the same rider as last week. Randy Skinner holeshot both motos and led for the majority of the motos until Monaghan arrived at the front. The final results were Mike Monaghan (1-1), Randy Skinner (3-2), Paul Fitz-Gibbon (2-4), Brian Allen (4-6), George Kohler (6-5), Joe Sutter (9-3), Owen Fitzsimon (8-7), John Caper (7-9), Mike Phillips (5-11) and Pete Vetrano (11-8).

LightSpeed owner Willie Amaradio raced the bike of 2011 Two-Stroke World Champion Austin Howell to second overall in the Over-50 Expert class. Over-50 winner Randel Fout was also two-stroke mounted. Photo: Mark Chilson

Over-50 Novice: With a full gate of riders the battle for supremacy in the Over-50 Novices has been very intense this year…and even though the honor of victory is eventually getting moved up to the much tougher Over-50 Intermediate class, every rider has been giving it his all. Mike Brownfield’s 1-2 took the win over Jeff Scott’s 4-1. Brian Underdahl (3-3), Terry Varner (5-4), Ian Pederson (7-6), Paul Chaffee (6-7), Michael Mosca (2-13), John Tookey (10-8), Brian Martin (9-9) and Steve Surber (8-10) rounded out the top ten.

Pasha Afshar (L7) and Kenny Safford (101) look like models in an AXO photo. Safford finished third in the Over-40 Novices, while last week’s winner, Afshar, ended up ninth. Photo: Mark Chilson

Over-40 Novices: Mike Borowski went 1-2 to beat Joe Sutter’s 5-1. Famous AXO and Alpinestars designer Kenny Safford was third with a 6-3 in front of John Maldonado (2-7), Gavin Antill (4-6) and Gary Harada (3-8).

Over-40 Intermediates: This was the second class that Alan Julien won.

Brian Stoner (749), Tom Hinz (92), Ernie Becker (23) and Billy Seifert rise above one of REM’s many hills in the Vet Novice class. Photo: Mark Chilson

Notable others: Matt Bynum (250 Novice), Braden Larson (450 Novice), Adam Dichter (Vet Beginner), Bill Nagy (450 Beginner), Tyler Weyman (125 Novice), Randel Fout (Over-50 Expert), Ray Pisarski (Over-60 Expert), Ciaran Heit (85 Expert) and Kyle Heit (85 Beginner) were all winners.

This photo may look tilted, but it’s not. Cary Brown (93) is on the flat section, while Ron Lawson (2), Braden Larson (21) and Brian Stoner are transitioning from on camber to off camber. Photo: Mark Chilson

REM races again next Saturday June 9. For more info go to www.remsatmx.com